Pierce Me: Satisfied by the Bad Boy cover
Book Review


I had a crush on her all the way through grade school

When Eloise walks into my tattoo parlor, she thinks she knows what she's after - a piercing to help take her where no man ever has. 
But I don't want to help her the way she thinks.
The last time I saw her was seventh grade, when my life was falling apart.
Now she has the same cute pony tail as always but the rest of her grown up body makes me hard just looking at it.
Forget the past. I'll give her a piercing all right, and it will be the deepest one of her life.
Never had an O, welcome to Oh My God!

*** A steamy STANDALONE contemporary romance with a sizzling hot alpha. No cliffhanger, no cheating, and a guaranteed happily-ever-after.***
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He Calls Me By Lightning: The Life of Caliph Washington and the forgotten Saga of Jim Crow, Southern Justice, and the Death Penalty cover
Book Review

A heroic reconstruction of the forgotten life of a wrongfully convicted man whose story becomes an historic portrait of racial injustice in the civil rights era.

Caliph Washington didn’t pull the trigger but, as Officer James "Cowboy" Clark lay dying, he had no choice but to turn on his heel and run. The year was 1957; Cowboy Clark was white, Caliph Washington was black, and this was the Jim Crow South.

As He Calls Me by Lightning painstakingly chronicles, Washington, then a seventeen-year-old simply returning home after a double date, was swiftly arrested, put on trial, and sentenced to death by an all-white jury. The young man endured the horrors of a hellish prison system for thirteen years, a term that included various stints on death row fearing the "lightning" of the electric chair. Twentieth-century legal history is tragically littered with thousands of stories of such judicial cruelty, but S. Jonathan Bass’s account is remarkable in that he has been able to meticulously re-create Washington’s saga, animating a life that was not supposed to matter.

Given the familiar paradigm of an African American man being falsely acc...
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Saving the Family Cottage: A Guide to Succession Planning for Your Cottage, Cabin, Camp or Vacation Home cover
Book Review

Estate planning for family cottages and cabins

When family members inherit a vacation home together, problems are often unavoidable, given that the new co-owners may have different financial circumstances or emotional attachments to the family cottage or cabin.

But you can head off damaging family squabbles by developing a legal structure (typically an LLC) to take care of the business of ownership. Whether you’re planning to pass on a cottage to your children, or you’ve inherited a cabin with your siblings, Saving the Family Cottage provides practical, legal solutions for preserving a beloved family property for generations to come. You’ll learn how to:

  • keep the peace (and avoid fights) among siblings over jointly-owned property
  • prevent a family member from forcing a sale of the cottage or cabin
  • keep your vacation home out of the hands of in-laws and creditors, and
  • make a smooth transition from one generation’s ownership to the next.

The fifth edition is updated to reflect current tax laws, including state property tax laws which affect choice of legal entity. It also includes an expanded discu...
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Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised In Brief, 2nd edition (Roberts Rules of Order in Brief) cover
Book Review

All the rules you need in a meeting made simple and easy--the only authorized concise guide on parliamentary procedure

Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised, In Brief was first published in 2005 to meet the need for a simple and short book on parliamentary procedure. This second edition of In Brief is now updated and revised to match the new full edition of Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised, also published this year.Written by the same authorship team behind the officially sanctioned Robert's Rules of Order, this concise, user-friendly edition takes readers through the rules most often needed at meetings-from debates to amendments to nominations. With sample dialogues and a guide to using the complete edition, Robert's Rules of Order, Newly Revised, In Brief is the essential handbook for parliamentary proceedings.
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America's Constitution: A Biography cover
Book Review

In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it.

We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding “We the People,” was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators’ inspired genius.

Despite the Constitution’s flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America’s Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution...
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Moral Combat: Good and Evil in World War II cover
Book Review

"Magnificent. . . . Seldom has a study of the past combined such erudition with such exuberance." —The Guardian 

"No-one with an interest in the Second World War should be without this book; and indeed nor should anyone who cares about how our world has come about." —The Daily Telegraph 

Pre-eminent WWII historian Michael Burleigh delivers a brilliant new examination of the day-to-day moral crises underpinning the momentous conflicts of the Second World War. A magisterial counterpart to his award-winning and internationally bestselling The Third Reich, winner of the Samuel Johnson prize, Moral Combat offers a unique and riveting look at, in the words of The Times (London), "not just the war planners faced with the prospect of bombing Dresden or the atrocities of the Holocaust, but also the individuals working at the coalface of war, killing or murdering, resisting or collaborating."

Product Description

"Magnificent. . . . Seldom has a study of the past combined such erudition with such exuberance." —The Guardian 

"No-one with an interest in the Second World War should be without this b...
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October: The Story of the Russian Revolution cover
Book Review

Award-winning author China Miéville plunges us into the year the world was turned upside down

On the centenary of the Russian Revolution, China Miéville tells the extraordinary story of this pivotal moment in history.

In February of 1917 Russia was a backwards, autocratic monarchy, mired in an unpopular war; by October, after not one but two revolutions, it had become the world’s first workers’ state, straining to be at the vanguard of global revolution. How did this unimaginable transformation take place?

In a panoramic sweep, stretching from St Petersburg and Moscow to the remotest villages of a sprawling empire, Miéville uncovers the catastrophes, intrigues and inspirations of 1917, in all their passion, drama and strangeness. Intervening in long-standing historical debates, but told with the reader new to the topic especially in mind, here is a breathtaking story of humanity at its greatest and most desperate; of a turning point for civilisation that still resonates loudly today....
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Scars of Independence: America's Violent Birth cover
Book Review

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW EDITOR'S CHOICE

A magisterial new work that rewrites the story of America's founding

The American Revolution is often portrayed as an orderly, restrained rebellion, with brave patriots defending their noble ideals against an oppressive empire. It’s a stirring narrative, and one the founders did their best to encourage after the war. But as historian Holger Hoock shows in this deeply researched and elegantly written account of America’s founding, the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles, but also a profoundly violent civil war—one that shaped the nation, and the British Empire, in ways we have only begun to understand.

In Scars of Independence, Hoock writes the violence back into the story of the Revolution. American Patriots persecuted and tortured Loyalists. British troops massacred enemy soldiers and raped colonial women. Prisoners were starved on disease-ridden ships and in subterranean cells. African-Americans fighting for or against independence suffered disproportionately, and Washington’s army waged a genocidal campaign against the Iroquois. In vivid, authoritative prose, ...
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